Interfaith Families Increasingly Jewish

Posted on January 13th, 2019
By STEWART AIN for The Jewish Week


Palm Beach County finds two-thirds of such couples raising Jewish children.


At the same time the rate of intermarriage among non-Orthodox Jews continues to rise, so does the percentage of such couples who are raising their children as Jews, according to Jewish population surveys conducted in recent years.

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Tu Bishvat

Posted on January 6th, 2019

This article has been reprinted with permission from InterfaithFamily.com 


For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit Jvillage Network's Tu Bishvat Guide. 


Tu Bishvat and some of the other smaller holidays—Sukkot, Shavuot, Purim—can be great ways to introduce Jewish partners to the beauty of Judaism. Every winter, just as we start to think about spring, a minor holiday comes along. Minor enough that not all of us know what it means or how it came to be. The resources on this page can help you and your family learn about the wonder of Tu Bishvat.

The upcoming dates for Tu Bishvat are:

Beginning at sundown on: January 20, 2019; February 9, 2020; January 28, 2021.

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With Intermarriage Endorsement, Rabbi Hopes To Start ‘Grass Roots’ Movement

Posted on December 30th, 2018
By Ari Feldman for The Forward
 

A synagogue in Virginia has issued a statement saying it’s in favor of Conservative rabbis presiding at interfaith weddings even though the movement still officially bans the practice.

In a Facebook post, the synagogue’s rabbi said that its board had voted to allow its clergy to marry a Jewish person to a non-Jewish person, but only when the movement formally allows its rabbis to do so. That means the vote and the statement are symbolic.

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Hanukkah AND Christmas: 7 Books for Interfaith Children

Posted on December 23rd, 2018

This article has been reprinted with permission from InterfaithFamily.com 


By Susan Katz Miller


Once upon a time, December holiday books for children focused on either Christmas, or Hanukkah. Now, many children grow up in Jewish families celebrating Christmas with Christian grandparents. Or, they grow up in Christian families celebrating Hanukkah with Jewish grandparents. Or, they grow up in interfaith families celebrating both. Here, I review seven Hanukkah and Christmas books, in order to help you find the right book for your young interfaith children or grandchildren.

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What Do Jews Do on Christmas?

Posted on December 16th, 2018
From Jewfaq.org


Christmas is not a Jewish holiday. Many Christians think of Christmas as an American holiday, a secular holiday or a cultural holiday, but most Jews today do not think of Christmas that way. According to the 1990 National Jewish Population Survey, 82% of Jewish households never have a Christmas tree (and the idea of a "Chanukkah bush" is mostly a joke, not anything anybody takes seriously). A 2013 Pew survey found that less than a third of Jews have a Christmas tree, and most of those are intermarried. Even among those who are intermarried, only 71% had a Christmas tree, far less than the 92% of Americans who celebrate Christmas. A 2007 survey by InterfaithFamily.com found that only 37% of interfaith families that have decided to raise the children Jewish have a tree in the home. 

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